Featured Session

Learning to anticipate service changes in lighting and sound requires a familiarity with your worship leader and tech team — it also requires an openness to God’s call to action, a Prophetic Technician.

“Unless you’ve scripted every nuance of your church worship experience, your intuition, feelings, and emotions remain powerful tools.”

One Friday night, I was training a new tech team member during a special worship service. About halfway through, I whispered to my new recruit, “I think our worship leader is about to switch things up a bit.”

I went on to predict the song he was going to add. I was right. So, we were ready with the changes for lyrics and sound and the transition went smoothly. My new recruit really wanted to know how I knew what would happen at just the right moment.

Depending on your background, you may have heard the term “prophetic worship.” But what about “prophetic tech”? Is there such a thing? Now, you may not consider my action as “prophetic,” and maybe it wasn’t. It could merely have been anticipating a change. But let’s take a closer look.

RECOGNIZING SIMILARITIES
A contemporary worship leader’s desire to leave room for God to move a service in the way He chooses is pretty universal. So, if a worship leader can get a sense of where a service should go, could this same sense transfer to the technical team assisting that leader? Is there such a thing as prophetic tech? The answer is yes — sort of.

1 Corinthians 12:12 says, “For as the body is one and has many parts, and all the parts of that body, though many, are one body—so also is Christ.” Within church ministry, we quote this passage and inadvertently spend a lot of time pointing out the differences between pastors, worship leaders, and techies. We talk about specific “gifts and abilities,” but what about all of our similarities?

1 Peter talks about being “like-minded, humble, and compassionate.” Amos 3:3 asks the question, “Can two walk together without agreeing to meet?” So, how do techies, pastors, and musicians humbly walk together in agreement? The answer is to find the ways that we are alike.

In many cases, we are all creative, passionate, articulate, and dynamic people. We share the common bond of the love of Jesus. We are all workers for the Kingdom of God. This sounds like an incredibly solid foundation for closer relationship — maybe even full-blown friendships.

DOING LIFE TOGETHER
“Doing life together” may have become somewhat of a cliché phrase in our churches. But the importance of the message remains. We should take the time to get to know one another on a deeper level. Spend time with your worship leaders and pastors. Eat together. Pray together. Play together. When you know what makes one another tick, you’ll likely have an inside track on how they respond to the move of God. During Jesus’ ministry, he was rarely outside the company of his disciples. We should model the same.

THREE STEPS TO BECOMING ‘PROPHETIC’
God wants to bring you and your teams to a place of unity in all things — even the technical.  To get the lights just right, to anticipate the best camera shot to set up, to act quickly when an unexpected song is just around the corner, these three steps will get you started:

1. Know God More. Work at hearing Him when He speaks.
2. Know Each Other Better — Friends can finish each other’s sentences. Spend time with your pastor and team members so you can anticipate each other’s behaviors.
3. Pray Together — Both on and off the stage, allow God to join you in heart, mind and spirit.

Unless you’ve scripted every nuance of your church worship experience, your intuition, feelings, and emotions remain powerful tools. This is often God moving you to action — and the Bible calls that prophetic.

GREGORY KAYNE has over twenty years of experience in communication, media production, and worship leading. He is a novelist, conference speaker, and director of media arts for Bethel Christian Fellowship in Rochester, NY.